3 Important Tips for Mixing Colours for Art

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There are few things you need to keep in mind if you want to succeed as an accomplished artist. One of these key points is the knowledge of how to mix colours. Mastering this will enhance your artistic skill and bring about a big difference in your work.

Before you start mixing colours, it is necessary to understand the qualities of different colours and how they react with each other. Here are four tips that can help you in the art of mixing colours.

Image Credits: http://bit.ly/29L1ojg
Image Credits: http://bit.ly/29L1ojg

Tip 1: Knowing your colours
There are three types of colours – Primary, Secondary and Tertiary. The primary colours are the group from which all other colours can be obtained by inter-mixing. Red, Yellow and Blue are commonly used as primaries when painting or drawing. Secondary colours are those that are achieved by mixing two Primary colours, and Tertiary colours are obtained by mixing equal parts of primary and secondary colours.

Image Credits: http://bit.ly/1RCufGH
Image Credits: http://bit.ly/1RCufGH

Tip 2: Play with blacks and whites
You can always add black to a particular colour if you want a darker shade. Similarly, simply add white to lighten a colour. It is important to remember that you must mix in the black or white in small amounts to ensure you get the right final shade.

Image Credits: http://bit.ly/29UQ20h
Image Credits: http://bit.ly/29UQ20h

Tip 3: Understand hues, lightness and saturation
There are three dimensions to any colour. The hue refers to its position on the colour wheel and all of its intermediate colours. For example- orange is a hue of brown (brown is a dark orange), and a few of its intermediate colours are orange-red or orange-yellow.

Image Credits: http://go.nasa.gov/1BMOk57
Image Credits: http://go.nasa.gov/1BMOk57

The lightness of a colour shows how near it is to either black or white. For instance, yellow is light colour and its lightness can be increased by adding white. On the other hand, blue is a naturally dark colour and is quite low on lightness. However, dark blue is even lower on the lightness scale.

Colours with high saturation are the bright colours that are seen on a colour wheel or rainbow. Less saturated colours include dark colours (shades), muted colours (tones) and pale colours (tints).

Image Credits: http://bit.ly/29QnIO2
Image Credits: http://bit.ly/29QnIO2

Shades, hues, tints, etc. can all sound rather overwhelming, but don’t let it get you down. The only way to learn more about mixing colours is to try it yourself, so grab a palette  some brushes and  colours from Kokuyo Camlin’s  wide range, and start mixing. You can always consult a colour chart if you need help.

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One comment

  1. You have a real ability for writing unique content. I like how you think and the way you renpseert your views in this article. I agree with your way of thinking. Thank you for sharing.

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